| 
  • If you are citizen of an European Union member nation, you may not use this service unless you are at least 16 years old.

View
 

bible017

Page history last edited by PBworks 13 years, 9 months ago

 

Vulgate Verses: Home - Previous - Next

 

Vulgate Verses 17: Latin

 

189. (Ecc. 11:7) Dulce lumen.

190. (Matt. 11:30) Onus meum leve est.

191. (Matt. 11:30) Iugum meum suave est.

192. (Proverbs 25:3) Cor regum inscrutabile.

193. (Proverbs 15.15) Secura mens quasi iuge convivium.

194. (Psalms 62:7) In Deo salutare meum et gloria mea.

195. (Psalms 27:1) Dominus lux mea et salutare meum.

196. (Azariah 3) Laudabile et gloriosum nomen tuum in saecula.

197. (Song of Sol. 4:3) Eloquium tuum dulce, sicut fragmen mali punici.

198. (Mark 10:27) Apud homines impossibile est, sed non apud Deum.

199. (James 1:17) Omne datum optimum et omne donum perfectum desursum est.

200. (Ecc. 8:6) Omni negotio tempus est et oportunitas.

201. (Sirach 2:12) Vae duplici corde.

 

Study Guide

 

189. The verb is implied but not expressed: Dulce (est) lumen.

190. The subject is onus meum and the predicate is the adjective leve.

191. The subject is iugum meum and the predicate is the adjective suave. We use the word "suave" in English, and it is derived from Latin, but the Latin has a different meaning: "sweet."

192. The verb is implied but not expressed: Cor regum (est) inscrutabile.

193. Be careful not to confuse the noun iugum with the adjective used here, iugis, with the neuter form, iuge.

194. The word salutare is an adjective, meaning "helpful, saving," being used here substantively, as a noun: "salvation."

195. The verb is implied but not expressed: Dominus (est) lux mea et salutare meum. See the note on the preceding verse for salutare.

196. This verse is from the apocryphal addition to the Book of Daniel of called the "Prayer of Azariah." The verb is implied by not expressed: Laudabile et gloriosum (est) nomen tuum in saecula.

197. Notice how the parallel comparison is expressed: Eloquium tuum (est) dulce, sicut fragmen mali punici (est dulce).

198. Notice how the parallel comparison is expressed: Apud homines impossibile est, sed non (impossibile est) apud Deum.

199. You can understand this as two parallel parts, with the predicate implied in the first part and expressed in the second: Omne datum optimum (desursum est) et omne donum perfectum desursum est.

200. The verb is expressed in the first part, and implied in the second: Omni negotio tempus est et oportunitas (est).

201. This verse is from the apocryphal book of Sirach. The exclamation vae takes the dative case, duplici. The ablative corde plays a descriptive role; we might say in English "at heart" or "in mind."

 

I'm adding new Study Guides every day or so at the Vulgate Verses blog. You can subscribe to that blog to get the latest updates on what's available.

 

 

 

Comments (0)

You don't have permission to comment on this page.