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group083

Page history last edited by Laura Gibbs 12 years, 8 months ago

 

Latin Via Proverbs: Home - Previous - Next

 

Group 83: Latin

 

1092. Elephantum sub alis celas.

1093. Delphinum cauda ligas.

1094. De asini umbra disputant.

1095. Aquae guttae saxa excavant.

1096. Monstrant astra viam.

1097. Caeli enarrant gloriam dei.

1098. Famam curant multi, pauci conscientiam.

1099. Saepius emendant incautum damna aliena.

1100. Fortuna amicos parat, inopia amicos probat.

1101. Fortuna cuncta versat in contrarium.

1102. Parva saepe scintilla magnum excitat incendium.

 

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Study Guide

 

1092. You are hiding an elephant under your arm. (You can find a related saying in Erasmus's Adagia, 2.5.56.)

 

1093. You are tying a dolphin by the tail. (You can find a related saying in Erasmus's Adagia, 1.4.93.)

 

1094. They are arguing about a donkey's shadow.  (You can read a brief essay about this proverb at the AudioLatinProverbs.com blog.)

 

1095. Drops of water carve out the rocks. (You can find many variant sayings such as Assidua stilla saxum excavat, Stilla continua cavat lapidem, etc.)

 

1096. The stars show the way. (A fuller form of this saying alludes to the story of the three wise men: Monstrant astra viam regibus, "the stars show the way to the kings.")

 

1097. The skies unfold the glory of God. (This is from the Psalms: Caeli enarrant gloriam Dei et opus manus eius adnuntiat firmamentum, "The skies unfold the glory of God and the firmament announces the work of his hand.")

 

1098. Many care for their reputation, few for their conscience. (This is a saying from Publilius Syrus.)

 

1099. Very often the mistakes of other people correct someone reckless. (Here is a fuller form of the phrase: Saepius emendant incautum damna aliena, flammarumque minae vicino ardente timentur, "Very often the mistakes of other people correct someone reckless, and when a neighbor's house is on fire, the flames' threats are feared.")

 

1100. Good luck yields friends, while poverty puts friends to the test. (You can read a brief essay about this proverb at the AudioLatinProverbs.com blog.)

 

1101. Fortune turns everything upside-down. (Fortune is the goddess with the wheel, spinning things up and down.)

 

1102. Often a small spark ignites a great fire. (There are many variants on this saying, such as this very simple version: Ex scintilla incendium, "from a spark, a fire.")

 

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