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group097

Page history last edited by Laura Gibbs 10 years, 10 months ago

 

Latin Via Proverbs: Home - Previous - Next

 

Group 97: Latin

 

1261. Supra spem spero.

1262. Fluctus numeras.

1263. Fluctus excitas in simpulo.

1264. Multae manus onus levant.

1265. Nec omnis venator est qui cornua sufflat.

1266. Verba ligant homines ut taurorum cornua funes.

1267. Facilius est camelum per foramen acus intrare.

1268. In pulicis morsu deum invocat.

1269. Parva necat morsu spatiosum vipera taurum.

1270. Et spem et metum fors caeca versat.

1271. Harmoniam rerum amor conservat.

1272. Passibus ambiguis fortuna volubilis errat.

1273. Successus ad perniciem multos devocat.

 

Audio

 



 

Study Guide

 

1261. I hope beyond hope. (This is the Jeffreys family motto.)

 

1262. You are counting the waves. (You can read an Aesop's fable about a fox who rebukes a man who is indeed trying to count the waves.)

 

1263. You are stirring up a tempest in a soup ladle. (This phrase is adapted from Cicero's De legibus.)

 

1264. Many hands lighten the load. (You can read a brief essay about this proverb at the AudioLatinProverbs.com blog.)

 

1265. Not everyone is a hunter who blows the horn. (A fuller form is Nec coquus in cultro, nec virgo crine probatur, nec omnis venator est qui cornua sufflat., "the cook is not proved by the knife, nor is the virgin by her hair, nor is everyone is a hunter who blows the horn.")

 

1266. Words tie people like ropes that tie the horns of bulls. (Compare the variant form Cornu bos capitur, verbo ligatur homo, "the ox is caught by the horn, and the man is bound by a word.")

 

1267. It is easier for a camel to enter through the eye of a needle. (This is based on a famous Bible saying: Facilius est enim camelum per foramen acus transire quam divitem intrare in regnum Dei, "it is an easier thing for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God.")

 

1268. For the bite of a flea, he calls upon god. (You can find this in Erasmus's Adagia, 3.4.4.)

 

1269. With a bite, the tiny viper slays the expansive bull. (You can find this saying in Ovid's Remedia Amoris.)

 

1270. Blind luck alternates both hope and fear. (This is a saying you can find in Seneca's Phoenissae.)

 

1271. Love preserves the harmony of things. (You can find this among the emblems of Daniƫl Heinsius.)

 

1272. Inconstant fortune wanders around with ambiguous steps. (You can find this line in the Carmina Burana.)

 

1273. Success leads many to destruction. (You can find this saying in one of the Aesopic fables of Phaedrus.)

 

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